Lost Letters Of Pergamum Audiobook

Lost Letters Of Pergamum Audiobook – A slave without a past. A champion without a future. A journey of discovery that changes both men’s lives forever. The ancient world comes alive in this vivid and engaging trilogy by experts in Roman social history. *********************** AUDIOBOOK NOW AVAILABLE ON AUDIO! What if you suddenly discovered that you are not who you thought you were – that your true fa Ori without a past. A champion without a future. A journey of discovery that changes both men’s lives forever. The ancient world comes alive in this vivid and engaging trilogy by experts in Roman social history. *********************** AUDIOBOOK NOW AVAILABLE ON AUDIO! What if you suddenly discovered that you were not who you thought you were—that your true family history had been hidden from you since birth? What if the truth about your origins causes others to despise you? What if the man who orchestrated the fraud was seriously ill and needed your help? What if you were a slave and this man held your life in his hands – and you held yours? These are some of the questions explored in the first two volumes of the new historical trilogy, A Slave’s Story. The story centers on a slave named Marcus who manages the business affairs of a wealthy Roman citizen in Central Asia Minor in the first century AD. The first volume, Asklepios’ Rooster, recounts his eventful journey to a famous healing center in western Turkey in response to a dream in which the god Asklepios seems to promise that his master will be cured of a gnawing disease there. The second volume, The Bull of Pluto, chronicles the aftermath of this journey as Marcus grapples with newly revealed secrets about his ancestry and his master comes to terms with his own mortality. Along the way, both men encounter people and ideas that undermine everything they’ve ever believed about themselves, each other, and the world around them. Societal norms are challenged, personal loyalties are tested, and identities are transformed in this compelling story that brings to life a unique corner of the Roman world that has been neglected by previous storytellers. Who will like this book? * Readers who enjoy complex stories of flawed characters, epic journeys, and characters struggling with their identities and responsibilities, including their views on religion * Readers who appreciate richly detailed and historically accurate accounts of daily life in the past * Readers who want to know more about early Judaism and Christianity from the social and religious world (including Roman religion and anti-Semitism); how the Greeks and Romans dealt with disease and healing (medicine, miracles and magic); and what life was like at certain Roman archaeological sites in Turkey (Ephesus, Pergamon, Hierapolis, Antioch, etc.). … more

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I think the main problem here is the genre. Christopher D. Stanley has done extensive research on Asia Minor in the first century CE, and this attention to detail comes through very clearly. The problem is that this book is meant to be read as fiction, and that’s where things get a little more complicated. It is the story of Marcus, who is a slave of Lucius Coelius Felix, a minor aristocrat of Antioch. The story begins with Marcus getting up after a night of sex with slave Selena to attend. I think the main issue here is the genre. Christopher D. Stanley has done extensive research on Asia Minor in the first century CE, and this attention to detail comes through very clearly. The problem is that this book is meant to be read as fiction, and that’s where things get a little more complicated. It is the story of Marcus, who is a slave of Lucius Coelius Felix, a minor aristocrat of Antioch. The story begins with Marcus getting up after a night of sex with the slave Selena to perform the household chores entrusted to him: preparing the family shrine for an early morning ritual, and later being present when dealing with his master’s business clients, taking notes. and do the accounting. Marcus is an unusual slave as Lucius is an unusual master; not only does he know his “letters and numbers,” but he is reliable and intelligent and knows how to satisfy his master’s every need. Similarly, Lucius recognizes Marcus’ worth and treats him better than a slave would expect. Lucius himself has a mysterious disease in his abdomen that neither doctors nor healing gods can cure. This disease causes great embarrassment to Lucius as it causes frequent bouts of diarrhea and urinary incontinence. When the local doctor, who has tried every remedy in the book, throws up his hands, Lucius is persuaded to go to the temple of Asklepios in Pergamon to ask the god for help. The journey itself is long and fraught with trials; Although Roman power is firmly established in the region and there are no bandits roaming the land, it is still extremely tiring as it is done in carts pulled by mule over sometimes mountainous terrain. And, of course, travelers must find lodging along the way, sometimes arranged with local aristocrats according to Roman custom, sometimes in local inns, and sometimes in tents in the open air. I learned A LOT from reading this book. One thing that struck me was how similar Roman religious practices were to early Christian practices. For example, the early morning ritual is described as a series of prayers and incantations spoken in a humming voice, not unlike how even modern Christian prayers are offered, at least in the Orthodox tradition. Even the content of the prayers seemed to me similar to Christian prayers, such as “Our Father in Heaven”. The early Christians are indeed mentioned in the book, as are the Jews (both as persecuted minorities), although they are not central to the story. The structure of local civil administration and the relationship between politics and commerce are very clearly and informatively laid out. But of course the main focus is on the lives of the slaves. Through Marcus, who is, as we have seen, somewhat privileged, we learn about other types of slaves, farm slaves, market slaves, female slaves and servants, people less fortunate than Marcus, who still sometimes had to put up with inhuman owners. Their only consolation was the firm belief that slavery was their appointed abode, that it was the will of the gods, and therefore there was no point in complaining, for that was how the goddess Fortuna had arranged things. The downside of the book, and the reason for my three star rating, is that as a novel it lacks drama. Too many details about everyday life and what Marcus does that don’t move the plot forward. As readers, we don’t need to know that Marcus overslept and didn’t participate in his master’s son’s contests, but learned the result from a passer-by UNLESS it has dramatic effect (eg the passer-by lied to him and the result was Marcus getting the events wrong). The inclusion of too many such side stories makes this book quite frustrating. In fact, I think the service of an old-school editor with a razor-sharp knife would have helped here. Cutting the word count down from over 500 pages to about half that could have made for a winning story. All the elements are there: some very strong and likable characters (although the female characters are less developed than the male ones), an attractive setting; in-depth knowledge of the relevant period. This book really needed some sharpening of its dramatic elements. People who are interested in the Roman era and the ancient world will enjoy it for what it is. However, it is a bit of a shame that the book is unlikely to be a huge success outside of a limited audience. Thanks to Netgalley and NFB Publishing for the advance copy. … more

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Lost Letters Of Pergamum Audiobook

Lost Letters Of Pergamum Audiobook

Very, very, very slow. The author tried to depict what life was like for a Roman, a free man or a slave. I can appreciate the effort. He obviously researched the subject thoroughly. However, the story really left a lot to be desired. Lucius Colius Felix is ​​a Roman aristocrat in the story. He lives in Antioch in the Roman Empire. He is a widow and takes a slave as his wife. He is an elderly gentleman with one son. Lucius’ main problem is that he has a disease. A book every few Very, very, very slow. The author tried to depict what life was like for a Roman, a free man or a slave. I can appreciate the effort. He obviously researched the subject thoroughly. However, the story really left a lot to be desired. Lucius Colius Felix is ​​a Roman aristocrat in the story. He lives in Antioch in the Roman Empire. He is a widow and takes a slave as his wife. He is an elderly gentleman with one son. The main problem with Lucius is that he

The Lost Letters Of Pergamum, 2nd Ed.: A Story From The New Testament World

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Halo, Saya adalah penulis artikel dengan judul Lost Letters Of Pergamum Audiobook yang dipublish pada October 13, 2022 di website Caipm

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