Warren Storm Seven Letters

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Warren Storm Seven Letters

Warren Storm Seven Letters

(Jin Records) 13 Tracks – At the end of 2018 the indestructible Cajun Country and Swamp Pop… more

Legends And Legacies’ Will Pay Tribute To Late Acadiana Musicians

(Jin Records) 13 Tracks – At the end of 2018 the indestructible legend of Cajun Country and Swamp Pop Warren Storm takes ”the country by storm” on the no less legendary Louisiana label Jin Records!

The most amazing thing about Lafayette, Louisiana, the capital of Cajun country and the most popular stop on Interstate 10 between Houston and New Orleans, is the entertainment. It offers both quantity and quality and never closes. One dancehall and drinkery, Four Seasons, is home base for Swamp Pop Legend, WARREN STORM. As long as he’s out of town, Warren can be heard six nights a week, enticing the loyal crowd with Cajun, Blues, Zydeco, and Swamp Pop favorites until 2 AM.

WARREN STORM, elite drummer and soulful singer, was born Warren Schexnider on February 18, 1937 near Abbeville, La., the county seat of Vermilion Parish. Picking up where his father left off, he started supplying the backbeat professionally at the age of fifteen to Larry Brasso’s Rhythmaires, a C&W outfit of great repute in the area, – a group with which he played for three years. Thereafter he began working with Herb Landry for a similar period to learn all the new R&B licks. Meanwhile, he also freelanced with Bobby Charles, playing both local dates and in New Orleans, where he met and was heavily influenced by Cosimo’s studio drummer, Charles “Hungry” Williams.

By the end of the fifties, he had formed his own combo, the We-Wows which evolved into the Jive Masters, bands that were in great demand in the region. In 1958 Crowley’s record producer, Jay Miller, was the first to record Warren and gave him the name WARREN STORM. His R&B twist to the Guy Massey standard, “PRISONER’S SONG”, was a huge hit and climbed to #80 on the Billboard charts. Several other releases followed by Warren could not repeat the triumph of his initial effort, but Warren was kept busy both night and day as a studio drummer at Miller’s studio, backing virtually all of Miller’s recorded artists. .

Warren Storm 45 Gotta Go Back To School / I Can’t Love You

After Warren’s contract with Miller ended in the early 1960s, he decided to try his luck with Houston-based producer Huey Meaux. There were a few regional hits when juke boxes still had enormous influence with the buying public, but that national hit never came and had Warren wondering if he was in the stars to continue this profession; but persistence, his strong suit, always won. Most likely, the beginning and the middle of the sixties were the most satisfying of his career in the sense that he had to experience growth as a musician, experimenting with all styles of music, playing with various combinations of personnel. As a trio of Swamp Pop legends, he, with Rod Bernard on guitar, and Skip Stewart on bass, carved a niche for themselves in rock and roll history as the Shondells. As a staff musician for Carol Rachou’s studio, he appeared on early Eddy Raven and Bobby Charles recordings, as well as on Dale & Grace’s 1963 #1 blockbuster, “I’m Leaving It All Up To You”.

Still employed as a studio musician, Warren added punch to the now classic Swamp Pop/Zydeco masterpiece, BOOGIE IN BLACK & WHITE (Jin 9014), a 1976 collaboration between Rod Bernard and Clifton Chenier. Always the local legend, Warren has, during the eighties, been called upon to supply the necessary tempo for many sessions of local producers, including Floyd Soileau’s JIN and MAISON de SOUL labels, or put in an appearance at a Cajun or Zydeco festival, including the annual New Orleans Jazzfest. It was during one of those sessions that producer Floyd Soileau mentioned that he had recorded almost every Swamp Pop.

A legend at one time or another, except for Warren Storm, and who would have loved the opportunity to do an album project with him whenever he was free from the contracts of other producers. And so, this album was recorded in Lafayette in 1991. Selected for this album were some of Warren’s regional hits as well as fan-requested favorites that sing the night away. The album is dedicated to all his loyal fans over the years. At fifty-five now, one wonders how long he can keep up the gueling pace, night after night. If you ask Warren, however, he will tell you, “As long as they grab these drumsticks from my cold, hard fingers.

Warren Storm Seven Letters

Jim Reeves: The Jim Reeves Radio Show: Monday February 24, 1958 (CD) Art-Nr.: ACD25002 Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 working days

From The Vaults: Warren Storm Born 18 February 1937

Jim Reeves: The Jim Reeves Radio Show: February 25-28, 1958… Art-Nr.: ACD25005 Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 working days

Dickson Hall: Outlaws Of The Old West (CD) Art-Nr.: ACD25006 Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 working days

Miscellaneous – Greetings From: Greetings From Oklahoma (CD) Art-Nr.: ACD25013 Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 working days

Margaret Lewis: Reconsider Me – The RAM Singles & More Southern… Art-Nr.: CDCHD1557 Only 1x still available Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 working days

Photograph And Autograph Of Warren Storm]

Connie Smith: Just For What I Am (5-CD Deluxe Box Set) Art-Nr.: BCD16814 This article has been deleted and can no longer be ordered!

Don Robertson: And Then I Wrote – Songs For Elvis (CD) Art-Nr.: BCD16654 Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 working days

Dwayne Dopsie & The Zydeco Hellraisers: Set Me Free (CD) Art-Nr.: CDLRHR7111 Only 1x still available Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 working days

Warren Storm Seven Letters

Zydeco Playboys: Just Do It (CD) Art-Nr.: CDOK210601 Only 1x still available Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 working days

Live And In The Studio By Warren Storm On Apple Music

Link Davis: Laissez Les Bon-Ta-Ru-La (Let The Good Times… Art-Nr.: BAF14020 Ready to ship today, delivery time** approximately 1-3 business days

Roy Carrier & The Night Rockers: A Living Legend (CD) Art-Nr.: CDSEV0031 Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 working days

COODER, Ry: Chavez Ravine (CD, Deluxe Edition) Art-Nr.: CD798772 Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 working days Often, an artist spends a large part of his career with the same producer. The producer seems only able to get the best out of the artist. Musical history is full of examples. However, despite this success, there is often the temptation to change the producer. It is as if the artist is eager to see if the grass is greener. This could prove fatal. A previously successful artist’s career can go south, and often never recover. That’s always the risk. It was a risk Warren Storm was not willing to take.

Warren Storm first worked with Huey Meaux in 1964. They worked together until 1982. However, Warren Storm had recorded so much music with Huey Meaux, that there was a lot of music left in the vault. By 1986, singles were being released that Huey Meaux produced for Warren Storm. Many of these singles that Huey Meaux produced for Warren Storm appear on a recent compilation released by Ace Records, The Good Times Make The Good Tunes-Classic Texas Recordings 1964-1986. It documents the most successful and productive period of Warren Storm’s career. His story began in 1937.

What Route 100 Says About Vermont: A Journey In Five Parts

The future Warren Storm, was born Warren Schexnider on February 18, 1937, in Abbeville, Louisiana. Warren grew up in a musical household. His father Simon, was a talented musician and member of the Rambler Rayne-Bo. He taught Warren to play drums and guitar. By the age of ten, Warren was already a talented musician, and as good, if not better than many older musicians.

So when Simon couldn’t make shows, he had a ready replacement in Warren. He made his debut for The Rayne-Bo Ramblers aged ten or eleven. The audience didn’t notice. Seamlessly, Warren fitted into the line-up of The Rayne-Bo Ramblers. Soon, other bands looking for a drummer, were giving Warren a call. It seemed almost inevitable that Warren would pursue a career as a musician.

By the time he was sixteen, Warren was the drummer in two local bands, the Herb Landry Band and Larry Brasson’s Rhythmaires. People were soon taking notice. Warren had an impressive voice, and with rock ‘n’ roll making his presence felt, he was in the right place at the right time.

Warren Storm Seven Letters

So was his friend Bobby Guidry. He had adopted the name Bobby Charles, and was making a name for himself as a budding young idol at Chess Records. This inspired Warren to form his own group, The Wow-Wows.

Rip It Up

It was around the time that Warren formed The Wow-Wows, that he began using the name Warren Storm. With a new name, the next step for Warren was for The Wow-Wows to release a record.

In 1957, The Wow-Wows recorded a few songs at the local radio station. The next step was to send tapes to various record companies. Nothing was made of these tapes. So towards the end of 1957, Warren’s friend Cliff Le Maire drove him to an audition for producer J.D. Miller, who had already experienced and

Devano Mahardika

Halo, Saya adalah penulis artikel dengan judul Warren Storm Seven Letters yang dipublish pada October 18, 2022 di website Caipm

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